After creating a new AngularJS project with Yeoman, I found this issue appearing:

grunt test
 
Running "karma:unit" (karma) task
WARN [karma]: Port 8080 in use
INFO [karma]: Karma v0.12.1 server started at http://localhost:8081/
WARN [launcher]: Can not load "Chrome", it is not registered!

The solution was to add karma-chrome-launcher to the package.json file which you can do with:

npm install karma-chrome-launcher --save-dev

How to Show a Firebug Console on JSFiddle

I recently was going through the book Javascript Enlightenment which had all code blocks linked directly to JSFiddle which I thought was a nice touch. The thing I noticed is that the output field contained a debugging console and I wanted to get this too. But where is it found? There be no options for that.

A little digging turned up some miscellaneous tips and surprisingly little from Stackoverflow.

Here is a step-by-step of what I pieced together.

Copy this link:

https://getfirebug.com/releases/lite/latest/firebug-lite.js

From your fiddle page, expand the External Resources menu on the left.
Paste your url into the input field and hit the button.

firebug-console-jsfiddle

Rerun your fiddle and if you have logged to the console it should display in your Result pane.

jsfiddle-console-added

Suhweet!

Easy Alert Dialogs in Thesis Theme 2.1

Thesis Bootstrap Alert Dialog

A quick way to add static Bootstrap-style alerts to your Thesis themed WordPress site posts or pages. If you want to add a simple, color-coded alert box to your Thesis theme, this is a super-simple CSS-only way to do it. It’s an easy way to draw attention to a section of the code and requires almost no effort or coding.

Example:

Well done! You successfully read this important alert message.

In just a few lines of CSS you can style up some eye-catching content boxes in your posts and pages.

Get the Code

Getting Started with Rails 4.0

Gettigng Started with Ruby on Rails 4

There are some cool new changes in Ruby On Rails 4 , but adding so many new features makes it challenging to learn it all and keep up. Fortunately, there are a bunch of awesome new books and resources that are popping up all over the place.

I’ve read three of the most current titles I could find on the subject: the classic Ruby on Rails Tutorial, Agile Web Development with Rails and Rails 4 In Action. All are great books, but depending on your interest you may want to choose one over the other.

I’ve personally used and endorse all of the following titles for learning Rails 3 or 4. Give them a try and see which works for you.

Before You Start

Even though these books start out pretty basic, it’s good to have knowledge of things like, well, some Ruby, the MVC design pattern and general programming knowledge. Also, you should understand HTML and CSS work as well as some basic knowledge of JavaScript and jQuery.

Each book will walk you through the basics of these concepts (each in a slightly different way), but you’ll learn more (and retain more) with the basic concepts already in your brain.

Ruby On Rails 4 Tutorial

rails-4-tutorial

Rails Tutorial

The Ruby On Rails Tutorial is probably the best way to start. This book starts out as basic as you can get, but you end up with a pretty cool Twitter clone when you’re finished. Each chapter demonstrates a single concept with some practical “playtime” activities at the end of each.

The author doesn’t specifically cover Rails 4, but his online version of the book (which is free by the way) contains an additional chapter which will “upgrade” the example project.

Another cool thing the author, Michael Hartl, has done, is to create a video tutorial course. It follows along with the book examples and is not cheap at $100. But, considering how in-depth the book is, and depending on your learning style, it may be just the thing for getting started even faster. If I started over I probably would have gotten the bundled book + video.

As a bonus perk, he also covers Rails 4 in this video course. You can check it out here.

Agile Web Development with Rails

Agile_Web_Development_with_Rails

Agile Web Development with Rails

Agile Web Development with Rails (4th Edition) is your next step for a good introduction. This is written by the excellent gang at the Pragmatic Book store. They have written some of the best programming books you can buy and this one is another great title. It also is co-authored by [David Heinemeier Hansson], the creator of Rails. So this may be a subtle endorsement that this is THE book to get started. I’ll let you be that judge.

It goes into some alternative details and builds out a full shopping-cart application, which is probably a more pragmatic ahem choice than the previous one, but it also allows you to explore some new frontiers.

While this book covers Test Driven Development, it doesn’t focus as much in this area as in the previous book, so if that is your interest, you may want to keep that in mind.

A final nice perk is that the application tutorial covers about 2/3 of the book and the rest is a focused look at each area of Rails such as: Active Record, Caching, plugins, etc. It becomes a handy reference.

Rails 4 In Action

rails-4-in-action

Rails 4 In Action

My last suggestion is a brand new book1 which you can get now only in eBook format. It’s titled Rails 4 In Action and is probably tied with the previous book for being up-to-date with the latest snazzy additions.

The reason I suggest this last is that it is definitely a more dense, challenging read than the previous two. I would even go so far as to say it’s an intermediate-level read: it explains less about some programming concepts and assumes more knowledge of coding practices. It’s less hand-holdy and might not make the best beginner book.

I was delighted to find this title to provide some other examples to learn from. It’s expanding the knowledge foundation laid by the two previous ones.

If you want to get started quickly with Rails , check them out.

Post Image Credit: Stigster via Flickr: CC License


  1. It’s officially published on September 26, 2011.

The World’s Largest DDoS Attack

One of the largest DDoS attacks is occurring right now.

DDoS protection outfit CloudFlare was hit with the attacks.

A Network Time Protocol (NTP) Reflection attack exploits a timing mechanism that underpins a way the internet works to greatly amplify the power of what would otherwise be a small and ineffective assault.[source: ITNews.com.au]

No one is yet sure the full impact of the attack, although at least one French networking host reported a 350Gbps DDoS attack during the assault.

CloudFlare chief executive Matthew Prince said the attack tipped 400Gbps, 100Gbps larger than the previous record DDoS attack which used DNS reflective amplification.

What I find to be most disturbing about these kinds of attacks is that it will be a weapon by corporations looking to privatize the web, pointing to this as an example of the “dangers” of an uncontrolled internet, it will surely be exploited for some private gain. The paranoid in my points to that the source of this attack may be on the gainful side of this attack. If not, they are merely blackening the future of the public internet.

Removing comments are closed text for Thesis 1.8 and 1.7 are of the most popular articles on this blog. It must be a common problem!

So, guess what? Thesis 2 and 2.1 came out and with the new UI design, things are back and it’s still a valid question.

The problem:

You’ve got a page or a post where you’ve disabled comments, maybe you’ve disabled commenting on your whole site, maybe just on a single page. In either case, your theme displays “Comments on this entry are closed.”

In some cases, you might want this, but if it’s on your About page or Contact page it looks dumb.

The solution is simple: Let’s get rid of it.

Read This Post

Removing Borders from Thesis 2.1

Some of my most often viewed posts are how to remove the borders from the default Thesis skin. I cover it for older versions of thesis here.

Time marches on, but since the release of 2.1 I’ve wanted to update it. The built-in CSS editor makes it pretty simple to do.

I’m taking a swag at doing some tutorial video content, which I, being rather introverted, have not done much of in the past. Please let me know what you think or what I should improve. Drop a comment, I’d love to hear from you!

Now on to the tutorial.
Watch the Video →

Had a little gotcha getting my contact form submit button styles going. I use the Thesis 2.1 WordPress theme and I’ve included Bootstrap into my theme includes Bootstrap (formerly Twitter Bootstrap) so if you have a different theme you may need to include it in your header.php or somewhere else. The format of the submit button is like so and will not work if you don’t get the title at the end. This wasn’t clear from the documentation I found, but it’s the way it be.

[submit id:main-submit class:btn class:btn-primary class:btn-lg "Send it!" ]

Classes are added individually, title goes at the end. Simple but hopefully this might save someone some head scratching.

Minimum Viable Product [DropBox]

A slide from Drew Houston’s presentation on how DropBox created interest in a product before it even existed. Great read.

[ Article Here ]

SoloPracticeManager.com is live

Solo Practice Manager

The first version of http://solopracticemanager.com has been out for 3 months now and is finally at a place where it is useful enough for general consumption. If you know any life coaches in need of help managing their practice have them check it out.

SoloPracticeManager is really a site for any single-owner business that needs to manage clients, so it’s not just life coaches, but personal trainers, massage therapists and any non medical practice. I’ve attempted to stay away from medical due to any possible privacy or HIPAA laws. Too much regulation and probably licensing.

Register for SoloPracticeManager.com at http://solopracticemanager.com/registration/register/ and get started for free!